Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘water’

Recently, my wife and I spent a couple of nights in Providence, Rhode Island, and we were able to see their famous WaterFire program conducted on average about every other weekend from May 26 to October 6. It is an awesome spectacle as nearly 80 mini-bonfires are lit on the city’s three rivers, to the accompaniment of beautiful music, dancing, and crowds of enthusiastic spectators. Image

Food and drink are readily available for purchase, and crowds are enthusiastic and also well-mannered. The program points out that “WaterFire was created by Barnaby Evans in 1994 as an art installation to revitalize the urban landscape of Providence and has now become one of Rhode Islands most popular tourist attractions.”

Image

They often have dance lessons, concerts, mimes, and other sorts of entertainment. It was really a great time, and I got some really interesting photos, some of which I will post here, and others will be posted on my various photography websites.

Image

Should you wish to visit WaterFire yourself, there are still four more performance: August 18, September 15, September 29, and October 6. Waterfire.org is the website. It’s a terrific evening—and the WaterFire itself and many other activities associated with it are FREE!

Image

Should you wish to view more of my WaterFire photos, please visit my facebook photography site at

http://www.facebook.com/mitchell.r.grosky.photography

Image

© Mitchell R. Grosky and Mitchell R. Grosky Photography Blog 2008-2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material including all photographs without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

 

The Quabbin Reservoir--New Salem Overlook

Once (and for about 200 years) there were four lovely, small towns in North-Central Massachusetts.  There nearly 3000 people lived, farmed, built small industries, attended school, worshiped in church, celebrated births and graduations and grieved over losing loved ones.  In Dana, Greenwich, Prescott, and Enfield, families built their homes and lives together.

All of this came to an end in April, 1938 when the four towns were sacrificed–dismantled, torn apart, and flooded–in order to create the Quabbin Reservoir.  This huge reservoir provides drinking water to the city of Boston and 40 other cities and towns in the Greater Boston region (among them are Arlington, Belmont,  Brookline, Chelsea, Clinton, Everett, Framingham, Lexington, Malden, Medford, Melrose, Milton, Newton, Norwood, Quincy, Reading, Revere, Somerville, Stoneham, Waltham, Watertown, and Winthrop.  It also provides water for Chicopee, Lynnfield Water District, Marblehead, Nahant, Saugus, Southborough, South Hadley, Weston, and Wilbraham).

It contains 412 billion gallons of water in an area of 38.6 square miles, but its watershed area is a full 185.9 square miles.  It is 18 miles long, and its shoreline is 118 miles, in total.    Its average depth is 51 feet, but it is 150 feet deep at its maximum depth.

In the past month, I have spent more time in the Quabbin—in parts of the Massachusetts towns of New Salem, Ware, and Belchertown–than in the previous 37 years I have lived here in Central Massachusetts.  It is a lovely area–ideal for hiking, fishing, and other recreational activities.  Yet, as I learn more about its origins,  I realize that every time I visit, just as I am enchanted by its beauty, so too am I saddened–often beyond words–by the awesome and awful sacrifice that four towns made so that Boston and 40 other communities could have pure drinking water.

Nikon D90, focal length of 32 mm, f 7.1, ISO 250, cloudy WB

Read Full Post »

A View of the Tall Ships Against the Boston Skyline

A View of the Tall Ships Against the Boston Skyline

On July 10 this past summer, my photography club (North Quabbin Viewfinders—www.nqviewfinder.org—) visited Boston to see the tall ships.  The fact that it was also my birthday made it doubly enjoyable as my wife and son accompanied us, and we met my daughter later near Boston.  It was a perfectly glorious New England summer day—sunny, dry, temps around 82-85 degrees.  The sky was a deep blue, and Boston was alive with excitement!   This was one of my favorite shots from that day.

Settings:  Nikon D90, 18-200 Nikkor VR lens, 27mm, ISO 500, f9.5, 1/350, 1/2 stop underexposed.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: